09 November 2018

Robson Lindberg speaks about pursuing goals at Northchill

News Northmill Robson

 

We invited athlete Robson Lindberg to our latest Northchill, a recurring event where we mix business and pleasure, to tell his story.

Robson had always been very attracted to sports and adrenaline. “I think I sat on a motorbike the first time when I was two”. Robson Lindberg started playing hockey in 2010. He was playing in a division 5 team when he participated in a match that would change his life.

During the game, he got checked by a much heavier player on the opposing team and fell to the ground head-first. Robson was rushed to the hospital and found out that he had suffered eight cerebral haemorrhages and lost a fifth of his cerebral beam.

Dealing with his new life

For the initial period, after he had stabilised, Robson tried to live his life normally, but many everyday activities became extremely challenging - he couldn’t put a glass of water to his mouth, and he could suddenly forget what his job was. But it wasn’t until Easter, about three months after the accident, that he truly realised what had happened to him. It was when meeting his family, and failing to be part of the lively conversations they had, that he realised he couldn’t keep up. “I was stubborn enough to say that I wanted to live alone. And every night that I came home, I cried my eyes out in the shower. At that time, I had a functioning time period of ten minutes per day.”

Setting the goals to succeed

That was when Robson admitted to himself that he was 30 years old and couldn’t write or provide for himself.  In his head, he responded by saying “Good, so what are you gonna do about it?” So Robson realised he needed a challenge. His first thought: winning Iron Man. But more than that, he thought he needed a “middle goal” as well, so he decided to become the best head trauma patient there was.

“I went on to challenge about 10 neurologists and 20 orthopedists to what is possible,” he said about trying to find help. It was tough when his neuropsychologist asked Robson what his goals were. He told her that he wanted to come back healthier and stronger than before the accident, but his psychologist shook her head and said that it was probably not possible. But after letting the thought of what was a “reasonable recovery” sink, Robson realised he didn’t want to settle for that. “The cool thing about dreams is that they are yours. And all the struggles that come along with them are yours. No person on earth is gonna understand what they are or understand the pain you go through. And they shouldn’t because it’s not their dream”.

“The cool thing about dreams is that they are yours. And all the struggles that come along with them are yours. No person on earth is gonna understand what they are or understand the pain you go through. And they shouldn’t because it’s not their dream.”

Robson still attends to therapy, in addition to his physical therapy, but his new neuropsychologist just recently admitted to understanding his point of view. What got him through his therapy was challenging and experimenting with how far he could go - how long he could focus on a single item in front of him, or how long he could run. It was this mentality that took him from swimming 100 meters in January 2017 to 3,7 km that same year in June.

Talking about CRAFT

Robson discussed how Northmill’s core values, CRAFT, has gotten him through so many things. By being relentless, active and focused, he achieved more than anyone around him believed he would. He wrapped up with his philosophy about how your personal goals, that other people cannot see, can make you do incredible things;  “If you can see the invisible, you can do the impossible”.

 

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